About Me

JUNIOR CRAWFORD’S BOOT CAMP GRADUATION PHOTO IN 1954

Hi Hyman snipes. I’m Jim Crawford, MMI, but known as “Junior” while on board the Hyman.  I went on board in late 1954, and worked primarily in the forward engine room.  I made MMI just 2 months before I was discharged in 1958, and was re-assigned to be in charge of the after engine room.  With only 2 months to go until my discharge, combined with my immaturity at the time (I was only 20), I didn’t much give a rat’s ass about being “in charge,” and consequently did a lousy job of it. 

After going aboard in 1954 at the ripe old age of 17, and looking more like the age of 14, an old (probably about 37) Bos’n’s Mate started calling me “Junior,” and soon everyone I knew on the Hyman called me Junior. 

In civilian life, I worked at several chemical manufacturing plants, a large engineering firm in Pasadena, California, and worked my last 13 years before retirement at the Northrop-Grumman aerospace facility in Palmdale, California on the B2 Stealth Bomber.

Recently, I began looking through some old photos from the Hyman days, and thought it would be a good idea to share them with other Hyman snipes by putting them on a web site, along with any other old photos or sea stories that other snipes may want to contribute. 

If you, or someone you know has photos, or maybe an interesting story from the Hyman days that you would like to share,  send it to: USS HYMAN SNIPES@AOL.COM,  and I will post it.   Thanks.  Junior.      I  ANSWER  ALL  EMAIL  LETTERS.

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14 Responses to About Me

  1. BOB ECKERT says:

    WOW, JUNIOR, YOU’VE OUTDONE YOURSELF. THAT IS ONE GREAT WEBSITE……………..YOU ARE TRULY A CREDIT TO YOUR RACE.
    YOU MUST HAVE PUT A LOT OF THOUGHT INTO THE DESIGN. IT GIVES A GOOD BASIS OF HISTORY PLUS LEAVING IT OPEN TO BOOTSTRAP NEW OR REMEMBERED INFORMATION. WITH ALL SERIOUSNESS, YOU’VE DONE A MAGNIFICENT JOB. BOB ECKERT 1953-1957

    • JUNIOR says:

      Hi Bob,
      Thank you for the kind words. I’m trying to get more input such as photos from the Hyman days, sea stories, information about old shipmates etc, but not having too much luck yet. I have some more email addresses that I have to contact yet. Thanks again for the “atta boy.” Junior

  2. jim donaldson says:

    THANKS FOR THE GREAT WEBSITE. GOOD JOB!
    DUCK DONALDSON

  3. JUNIOR says:

    Thanks Duck. I’ll keep working on it to try to make it bigger and better. We need more photos and Hyman sea stories. Junior

  4. Angelo (bob) Angeli says:

    Great job.

  5. richard boucher says:

    Junior, thanks for putting this site up. My father, Dick Boucher, was a boiler tech on the Hyman during the Korean War. brings me to tears to see photos of the engine room and other spaces where he toiled as a young man.
    Sincerely,

    Richard A. Boucher Jr. (junior!)

    • JUNIOR says:

      Hi Richard, Thanks for the compliment, and glad you enjoyed it. I’ll be adding more to the site in the next week or so, so be sure to check back. I didn’t go aboard the Hyman until after the Korean War, (1954) so unfortunately , I didn’t get to know your dad. Cheers. Junior

  6. John W Muir says:

    Hi, Junior, I remember you. I served on the Hyman from April 55 to March 57. I was a Shipfitter, actually rated as Pipefitter, FP2, and occasionally got to stand messenger watchs in the engine rooms. Thanks for getting this website up. I feel great remorse at the loss of Bob Eckert,and that I was not able to contact before he died. Bob and I and several others would make the drive to Cleveland whenever we had a 96 hour weekend. Bob had a 54 Chevy, and we would drop off guys on the way to Cleveland, and I would get a train and continue on to Toledo and then drive back to Cleveland to make the trip, picking up the guys we left off on the way, back to Newport.

    On one occasion the muffler went out on Bob’s car and the guys in the A Gang made him a muffler from a shell case. Anybody remember that ? I have a few pictures from my time on the Hyman and would be glad to share them.
    I will have to find out how to do that, as I would like to get them to the Association too. well.

    • JUNIOR says:

      Hi John, I remember you too. It’s ironic that you mentioned the muffler made from a 5″ shell casing, because I wrote about the muffler in my tribute to Bob at his memorial in March. The preacher at the service read it during the ceremony, and I will send a copy to you in a seperate email. I lived in Massillon, Ohio from birth (1937) until 1969, when we moved to California. I used to drive my 1949 Plymouth to Massillon on 72 hour passes, but I always had other Ohio guys to help drive and pay expenses. ( I knew one guy who would go to Massillon on 48 hour passes.) That was really stretching the limit. It’s easy to send photos by email, if your printer has a scanner. Just scan them in to your computer, and then copy and paste them to the email. If they are already in your printer, you can just send them in the email as an attachment. We can really use those pictures on the site. Later. Junior

      • John W Muir says:

        It;s good to get back to former shipmates. My son said he would help me put the photos in a file so they can be sent. His fear is that I will send the photos to someone where he can’t have them. I did that with some from the LOF plant where I worked , and he was not happy about that. It is part of an archive the library in Rossford, where the part of the plant
        still exists, is developing.

      • JUNIOR says:

        Hi John,

        Your photos will not be lost because the computer doesn’t send the originals, it only sends copies of the original. When you send photos by email, you will not lose the original. If you want to test sending photos before you send them to me, just send a photo to your son’s computer. You will both have the same photo.
        Also, you do not have to put them all in a file, just send them one at a time. Give it a try.
        Junior

  7. richard boucher says:

    Hey Junior,

    Can you point me to some detailed info on the Hyman’s ship to shore artillery battle during the Korean War? My father told me that the ship was shelled, I’ve read Mr. Bacon’s account of men killed and blown overboard, that the ship emptied it’s magazines during the exchange… but wikipedia simply says “Hyman arrived Wonsan for shore bombardment 6 November, remaining in the area until 19 November, when she moved farther out to sea as plane guard for Australian aircraft carrier Sydney. Returning to Wonsan Harbor the destroyer engaged in a gunnery duel with batteries on Kalmo Pando peninsula 24 November, sustaining minor shrapnel damage during the close-in exchange.

    My father told me a story of that day, that a shell penetraed several decks and blew up in the galley’s flour bin and he encountered a man stumbling out of the galley so white w/ flour he looked like a ghost….and also that men where killed.

    If you can point me to the full story, I’ll see that the wikipedia entry gets updated.

    Thanks!

    Richard A. Boucher Jr

    So what gives, “minor shrappnel damage” or

    • JUNIOR says:

      Hi Richard,
      Unfortunately, I am not much help on this, I didn’t go aboard the Hyman until late 1954. I did, however, hear the report on the shell that exploded in the galley flour bin from one of the mess cooks, sometime after I went aboard.. I know there were 5 Hyman sailors killed during the Korean war, but I have no records on how, when, or where. I know that the Hyman was refitted for the Korean War in 1951, began shore bombardment of Wonsan North Korea in early November 1951, and continued patrolling the area around Wonsan engaging the enemy until February, 1952. You may get more information from some of the guys that were on board during the Korean War by going to http://www.destroyers.org/smrdd/uss_hyman.html. Also try, http://www.destroyersonline.com/usndd/dd732/dd732pho.htm, and scroll to “The Crews” at the bottom of the page. Many have their email addresses listed. Sorry I couldn’t be any more help. Good luck. Junior

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